May 30

Whats new vSphere 6.5 vCenter Server High Availability

This video covers Whats new vSphere 6.5 High Availability.

Rating: 5/5


May 30

What’s New in vSphere 6.5 Migration

This video covers what’s new in vSphere 6.5 migrating from a windows vCenter server to the vCenter Server Appliance 6.5.

Rating: 5/5


May 30

Introduction to the vSphere Client 6.5

This video is an introduction to some new features in the vSphere Client 6.5.

Rating: 5/5


May 30

What’s New in vSphere 6.5 vCenter Server Appliance 6.5 File-Based Backup and Restore

This video covers What’s New in vSphere 6.5 vCenter Server Appliance 6.5 File-Based Backup and Restore.

Rating: 5/5


May 15

vSphere 6.5 Upgrade Considerations Part-1

Emad Younis posted May 15, 2017.
The release of vSphere 6.5 in November 2016 introduced many new features and enhancements. These include the vCenter Server Appliance (VCSA) now becoming the default deployment. vCenter Server native high availability, which protects vCenter Server from application failure. Built-in File-Based backup and restore allows customers the ability to backup their vCenter Server from the VAMI or by API. The VCSA restore can simply be done by mounting the original ISO used to deploy the VCSA and selecting the restore option. These features and more are exclusive only to the vCenter Server Appliance. The new HTML5 vSphere Client is making its first official product debut with vSphere 6.5.

Did someone say security? We now have better visibility of vSphere changes with actionable logging. VM Encryption allows the encryption of a virtual machine, including disks and snapshots. Secure Boot for ESXi ensures that only digitally signed code runs on the hypervisor. Secure Boot for VM’s is as simple as checking a box. We’ve only begun to scratch the surface of all the new vSphere 6.5 features.

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vCenter-6.5-Features

Product Education

As you start preparing for your vSphere 6.5 upgrade, a checklist will be the run book used to ensure its success. The upgrade process can be divided into three phases:

Phase 1: Pre-upgrade – all the upfront work that should be done before starting an upgrade.
Phase 2: Upgrade – mapping the steps of each component that will be upgraded.
Phase 3: Post-upgrade – validation to ensure everything went according to plan.

The first part of any successful upgrade is determining the benefits of the new features and the value add they will provide to your business. Next is getting familiar with these new features and how they will be implemented in your environment. The following list will get you started learning each of the new vSphere 6.5 features and their benefits.

Another consideration to getting familiar with the new features and upgrade process is the hands on approach in a lab environment. If you have a lab environment at your disposal, try building it as close to your production environment as possible to simulate both the upgrade process and new feature implementation. If a lab environment is not available, there are options like VMware’s Workstation or Fusion if you have the resources to run them. Last, but not least, there is also the Hands on Labs that do not require any resources and provide a guided approach. No matter which option you select, the key is getting familiar and comfortable with the upgrade process.

Health Assessment

crn-products-of-the-year-2016-400.jpg Doing a health assessment of your current environment is critical. Nothing is worse than being in the middle of an upgrade and having to spending hours troubleshooting an issue only to find out it was related to a misconfiguration with something as simple as DNS or NTP. Another advantage to doing a health assessment is discovering wasted resources. For example, virtual machines that are no longer needed but have yet to be decommissioned. The health assessment should cover all components (Compute, Storage, Network, 3rd party) that interact with your vSphere environment. Please consult with your compute, storage, and network vendors for health assessment best practices and tools. Environmental issues are high on the list when it comes to upgrade show stoppers. The good news is that they can be prevented.

There are also VMware and community tools that can help by providing reports on your current environment. Most of these tools come with a 60-day evaluation period, which is enough time to get the information needed. When using community tools please keep in mind they are not officially supported by VMware. Finally, there is also the VMware vSphere health check done by a certified member of VMware’s professional services team. Check with your VMware representative for more information.

Conducting the health assessment could lead to discovering an issue that requires the help of support and opening a ticket. Do not proceed with the upgrade until all open support tickets have been resolved. There are instances where an issue can be fixed by applying a patch or an update, but make sure that any environmental problems have completely been resolved prior to proceeding. This not only includes VMware support tickets, but also compute, storage, network, and 3rd party that interact with your vSphere environment.

Important Documents

Now that we’ve learned about the features and completed a health assessment of our current vSphere environment, it’s time to start mapping out the upgrade process. The first step is looking at important documents like the vSphere 6.5 documentation, product release notes, knowledge base articles, and guides. Each of these documents have pieces of information which are vital to ensuring a successful upgrade. Product release notes, for example, provide information such as what’s new but also information about upgrades, any known issues, and all key pieces of information. Reading the vSphere 6.5 upgrade guide will give you an understanding of the upgrade process. The VMware compatibility guide and Product interoperability matrices will ensure components and upgrade paths are supported. Here is a breakdown of the important vSphere 6.5 documentation that should be viewed prior to upgrading.

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vSphere 6.5Documents

Product Release Notes

Knowledge Base Articles

Guides

Documentation

Upgrades need to be done with a holistic view from the hardware layer all the way to the application layer. With this philosophy in mind, a successful upgrade requires advance prep work to be done to avoid any potential roadblocks. Things like health assessments shouldn’t only be done when preparing for an upgrade, but also routinely. Think of it as a doctor’s visit for your environment and getting a clean bill of health. vSphere 6.5 has been released now for six months and since then four patches are now available providing bug fixes and product updates. The HTML5 vSphere Client now has added features in the release of vSphere 6.5.0 patch b and vSAN easy install is available in 6.5.0 patch d. This agile release of patches means customers no longer need to wait on the first update to consider upgrading to vSphere 6.5. The next few blog posts in this series will cover mapping out the upgrade process whiteboard style, architecture considerations for the vSphere Single Sign-On domain, migration, and upgrade paths.

At this point it is worth noting that the vSphere upgrade process can seem complex if not overwhelming, especially for our customers who use other tools that depend on vSphere and vCenter Server. We hear you. VMware is certainly working to make this better. I hope to be able to write about those improvements in the future. Until then you have upgrade homework to do!

About the Author

Emad Younis is a Staff Technical Marketing Architect and VCIX 6.5-DCV working in the Cloud Platform Business Unit, part of the R&D organization at VMware. He currently focuses on the vCenter Server Appliance, vCenter Server Migrations, and VMware Cloud on AWS. His responsibilities include generating content, evangelism, collecting product feedback, and presenting at events. Emad can be found blogging on emadyounis.com or on Twitter via @emad_younis.

Rating: 5/5


Oct 18

What’s New in vSphere 6.5: Host & Resource Management and Operations

Posted on October 18, 2016 by Charu Chaubal

vSphere 6.5 brings a number of enhancements to ESXi host lifecycle management as well as some new capabilities to our venerable resource management features, DRS and HA. There are also greatly enhanced developer and automation interfaces, which are a major focus in this release. Last but not least, there are some notable improvements to vRealize Operations, since this product is bundled with certain editions of vSphere. Let’s dig into each of these areas.

Enhanced vSphere Host Lifecycle Management Capabilities

With vSphere 6.5, administrators will find significantly easier and more powerful capabilities for patching, upgrading, and managing the configuration of VMware ESXi hosts.

VMware Update Manager (VUM) continues to be the preferred approach for keeping ESXi hosts up to date, and with vSphere 6.5 it has been fully integrated with the VCSA. This eliminates the additional VM, operating system license, and database dependencies of the previous architecture, and now benefits from the resiliency of vCenter HA for redundancy. VUM is enabled by default and ready to handle patching and upgrading tasks of all magnitudes in your datacenter.

Host Profiles has come a long way since the initial introduction way back in vSphere 4! This release offers much in the way of both management of the profiles, as well as day-to-day operations. For starters, an updated graphical editor that is part of the vSphere Web Client now has an easy-to-use search function in addition to a new ability to mark individual configuration elements as favorites for quick access.

vSphere Host Profile Editor

vSphere Host Profile Editor

Administrators now have the means to create a hierarchy of host profiles by taking advantage of the new ability to copy settings from one profile to one or many others.

Although Host Profiles provides a means of abstracting management away from individual hosts in favor of clusters, each host may still have distinct characteristics, such as a static IP address, that must be accommodated. The process of setting these per-host values is known as host customization, and with this release it is now possible to manage these settings for groups of hosts via CSV file – undoubtedly appealing to customers with larger environments.

Compliance checks are more informative as well, with a detailed side-by-side comparison of values from a profile versus the actual values on a host. And finally, the process of effecting configuration change is greatly enhanced in vSphere 6.5 thanks to DRS integration for scenarios that require maintenance mode, and speedy parallel remediation for changes that do not.

Auto Deploy – the boot-from-network deployment option for vSphere – is now easier to manage in vSphere 6.5 with the introduction of a full-featured graphical interface. Administrators no longer need to use PowerCLI to create and manage deploy rules or custom ESXi images.

Auto Deploy

Auto Deploy


New and unassigned hosts that boot from Auto Deploy will now be collected under the Discovered Hosts tab as they wait patiently for instructions, and a new interactive workflow enables provisioning without ever creating a deploy rule.

Custom integrations and other special configuration tasks are now possible with the Script Bundle feature, enabling arbitrary scripts to be run on the ESXi hosts after they boot via Auto Deploy.

Scalability has been greatly improved over previous releases and it’s easy to design an architecture with optional reverse proxy caches for very large environments needing to optimize and reduce resource utilization on the VCSA. And like VUM, Auto Deploy also benefits from native vCenter HA for quick failover in the event of an outage.

In addition to all of that, we are pleased to announce that Auto Deploy now supports UEFI hardware for those customers running the newest servers from VMware OEM partners.

It’s easy to see how vSphere 6.5 makes management of hosts easier for datacenters of all sizes!

Resource Management – HA, FT and DRS

vSphere continues to provide the best availability and resource management features for today’s most demanding applications. vSphere 6.5 continues to move the needle by adding major new features and improving existing features to make vSphere the most trusted virtual computing platform available. Here is a glimpse of the what you can expect to see when vSphere 6.5 later this year.

Proactive HA

Proactive HA will detect hardware conditions of a host and allow you to evacuate the VMs before the issue causes an outage. Working in conjunction with participating hardware vendors, vCenter will plug into the hardware monitoring solution to receive the health status of the monitored components such as fans, memory, and power supplies. vSphere can then be configured to respond according to the failure.

Once a component is labeled unhealthy by the hardware monitoring system, vSphere will classify the host as either moderately or severely degraded depending on which component failed. vSphere will place that affected host into a new state called Quarantine Mode. In this mode, DRS will not use the host for placement decisions for new VMs unless a DRS rule could not otherwise be satisfied. Additionally, DRS will attempt to evacuate the host as long as it would not cause a performance issue. Proactive HA can also be configured to place degraded hosts into Maintenance Mode which will perform a standard virtual machine evacuation.

vSphere HA Orchestrated Restart

vSphere 6.5 now allows creating dependency chains using VM-to-VM rules. These dependency rules are enforced if when vSphere HA is used to restart VMs from failed hosts. This is great for multi-tier applications that do not recover successfully unless they are restarted in a particular order. A common example to this is a database, app, and web server.

In the example below, VM4 and VM5 restart at the same time because their dependency rules are satisfied. VM7 will wait for VM5 because there is a rule between VM5 and VM7. Explicit rules must be created that define the dependency chain. If that last rule were omitted, VM7 would restart with VM5 because the rule with VM6 is already satisfied.

Orchestrator HA

Orchestrator HA


In addition to the VM dependency rules, vSphere 6.5 adds two additional restart priority levels named Highest and Lowest providing five total. This provides even greater control when planning the recovery of virtual machines managed by vSphere HA.

Simplified vSphere HA Admission Control

Several improvements have been made to vSphere HA Admission Control. Admission control is used to set aside a calculated amount of resources that are used in the event of a host failure. One of three different policies are used to enforce the amount of capacity is set aside. Starting with vSphere 6.5, this configuration just got simpler. The first major change is that the administrator simply needs to define the number of host failures to tolerate (FTT). Once the numbers of hosts are configured, vSphere HA will automatically calculate a percentage of resources to set aside by applying the “Percentage of Cluster Resources” admission control policy. As hosts are added or removed from the cluster, the percentage will be automatically recalculated. This is the new default configuration, but it is possible to override the automatic calculation or use another admission control policy.

Additionally, the vSphere Web Client will issue a warning if vSphere HA detects a host failure would cause a reduction in VM performance based on the actual resource consumption, not only based on the configured reservations. The administrator is able to configure how much of a performance loss is tolerated before a warning is issued.

Admission Control

Admission Control

Fault Tolerance (FT)

vSphere 6.5 FT has more integration with DRS which will help make better placement decisions by ranking the hosts based on the available network bandwidth as well as recommending which datastore to place the secondary vmdk files.

There has been a tremendous amount of effort to lower the network latency introduced with the new technology that powers vSphere FT. This will improve the performance to impact to certain types of applications that were sensitive to the additional latency first introduced with vSphere 6.0. This now opens the door for even a wider array of mission critical applications.

FT networks can now be configured to use multiple NICs to increase the overall bandwidth available for FT logging traffic. This is a similar configuration to Multi-NIC vMotion to provide additional channels of communication for environments that required more bandwidth than a single NIC can provide.

DRS Advanced Options

Three of the most common advanced options used in DRS clusters are now getting their own checkbox in the UI for simpler configuration.

  • VM Distribution: Enforce an even distribution of VMs. This will cause DRS to spread the count of the VMs evenly across the hosts. This is to prevent too many eggs in one basket and minimizes the impact to the environment after encountering a host failure. If DRS detects a severe imbalance to the performance, it will correct the performance issue at the expense of the count being evenly distributed.
  • Memory Metric for Load Balancing: DRS uses Active memory + 25% as its primary metric when calculating memory load on a host. The Consumed memory vs active memory will cause DRS to use the consumed memory metric rather than Active. This is beneficial when memory is not over-allocated. As a side effect, the UI show the hosts be more balanced.
  • CPU over-commitment: This is an option to enforce a maximum vCPU:pCPU ratios in the cluster. Once the cluster reaches this defined value, no additional VMs will be allowed to power on.
DRS settings

DRS settings

Network-Aware DRS

DRS now considers network utilization, in addition to the 25+ metrics already used when making migration recommendations. DRS observes the Tx and Rx rates of the connected physical uplinks and avoids placing VMs on hosts that are greater than 80% utilized. DRS will not reactively balance the hosts solely based on network utilization, rather, it will use network utilization as an additional check to determine whether the currently selected host is suitable for the VM. This additional input will improve DRS placement decisions, which results in better VM performance.

SIOC + SPBM

Storage IO Control configuration is now performed using Storage Policies and IO limits enforced using vSphere APIs for IO Filtering (VAIO). Using the Storage Based Policy Management (SPBM) framework, administrators can define different policies with different IO limits, and then assign VMs to those policies. This simplifies the ability to offer varying tiers of storage services and provides the ability to validate policy compliance.

VM Storage Policy

VM Storage Policy

Content Library

Content Library with vSphere 6.5 includes some very welcome usability improvements. Administrators can now mount an ISO directly from the Content Library, apply a Guest OS Customization during VM deployment, and update existing templates.

Performance and recoverability has also been improved. Scalability has been increased, and there is new option to control how a published library will store and sync content. When enabled, it will reduce the sync time between vCenter Servers are not using Enhanced Linked Mode.

The Content Library is now part of the vSphere 6.5 backup/restore service, and it is part of the VC HA feature set.

Developer and Automation Interfaces

The vSphere developer and automation interfaces are receiving some fantastic updates as well. Starting with the vSphere’s REST APIs, these have been extended to include VCSA and VM based management and configuration tasks. There’s also a new way to explore the available vSphere REST APIs with the API Explorer. The API Explorer is available locally on the vCenter server itself and will include information like what URL the API tas is available to be called by, what method to use, what the request body should look like, and even a “Try It Out” button to perform the call live.

API explorer

API explorer


Moving over to the CLIs, PowerCLI is now 100% module based! There’s also some key improvements to some of those modules as well. The Core module now supports cross vCenter vMotion by way of the Move-VM cmdlet. The VSAN module has been bolstered to feature 13 different cmdlets which focus on trying to automate the entire lifecycle of VSAN. The Horizon View module has been completely re-written and allows users to perform View related tasks from any system as well as the ability to interact with the View API.

The vSphere CLI (vCLI) also received some big updates. ESXCLI, which is installed as part of vCLI, now features several new storage based commands for handling VSAN core dump procedures, utilizing VSAN’s iSCSI functionality, managing NVMe devices, and other core storage commands. There’s also some additions on the network side to handle NIC based commands such as queuing, coalescing, and basic FCOE tasks. Lastly, the Datacenter CLI (DCLI), which is also installed as part of vCLI, can make use of all the new vSphere REST APIs!

Check out this example of the power of DCLI’s interactive mode with features like tab complete:

DCLI interactive

DCLI interactive

Operations Management

There’s been some exciting improvements on the vSphere with Operations Management (vSOM) side of the house as well. vRealize Operations Manager (vR Ops) has been updated to version 6.4 which include many new dashboards, dashboard improvements, and other key features to help administrators get to the root cause that much faster and more efficient. Log Insight for vCenter has been also updated, and will be on version 4.0. It contains a new user interface (UI) based on our new Clarity UI, increased API functionality around the installation process, the ability to perform automatic updates to agents, and some other general UI improvements. Also, both of these products will be compatible with vSphere 6.5 on day one.

Digging a little further into the vR Ops improvements, let’s first take a look at the three new dashboards titled: Operations Overview, Capacity Overview, and Troubleshoot a VM. The Operations dashboard will display pertinent environment based information such as an inventory summary, cluster update, overall alert volume, and some widgets containing Top-15 VMs experiencing CPU contention, memory contention, and disk latency. The Capacity dashboard contains information such as capacity totals as well as capacity in use across CPU count, RAM, and storage, reclaimable capacity, and a distributed utilization visualization. The Troubleshoot a VM dashboard is a nice central location to view individual VM based information like its alerts, relationships, and metrics based on demand, contention, parent cluster contention, and parent datastore latency.

vROPS Dashboard

vROPS Dashboard

One other improvement that isn’t a dashboard but is a new view for each object, is the new resource details page. It closely resembles the Home dashboard that was added in a prior version, but only focuses on the object selected. Some of the information displayed is any active alerts, key properties, KPI metrics, and relational based information.

vROPS details

vROPS details

Covering some of the other notable improvements, there is now the ability to display the vSphere VM folders within vR Ops. There’s also the ability to group alerts so that it’s easy to see what the most prevalent alert might be. Alert groups also enable the functionality to clear alerts in a bulk fashion. Lastly, there are now KPI metric groups available out of the box to help easily chart out and correlate properties with a single click.

To learn more about vSphere 6.5, please see the following resources.

Rating: 5/5


Oct 18

What’s new in vSphere 6.5: Security

Posted on October 17, 2016 by Mike Foley

vSphere 6.5 is a turning point in VMware infrastructure security. What was mostly an afterthought by many IT folks only a few short years ago is now one of the top drivers of innovation for vSphere. Security has become a front and center focus of this release and I think you’ll like what we’ve come up with.

Our focus on security is manageability. If security is not easy to implement and manage then the benefit it may bring is offset. Security in a virtual infrastructure must be able to be done “at scale”. Managing 100’s or 1000’s of security “snowflakes” is something no IT manager wants to do. She/He doesn’t have the resources to do that. The key to security at scale is automation and in these new features you’ll see plenty of that.

VM Encryption

Encryption of virtual machines is something that’s been on-going for years. But, in case you hadn’t noticed, it just hasn’t “taken off” because every solution has a negative operational impact. With vSphere 6.5 we are addressing that head on.

Encryption will be done in the hypervisor, “beneath” the virtual machine. As I/O comes out of the virtual disk controller in the VM it is immediately encrypted by a module in the kernel before being send to the kernel storage layer. Both VM Home files (VMX, snapshot, etc) and VMDK files are encrypted.

The advantages here are numerous.

    1. Because encryption happens at the hypervisor level and not in the VM, the Guest OS and datastore type are not a factor. Encryption of the VM is agnostic.
    2. Encryption is managed via policy. Application of the policy can be done to many VM’s, regardless of their Guest OS.
    3. Encryption is not managed “within” the VM. This is a key differentiation to every other solution in the market today! There are no encryption “snowflakes”. You don’t have to monitor whether encryption is running in the VM and the keys are not contained in the VM’s memory.
    4. Key Management is based on the industry standard, KMIP 1.1.
    In vSphere vCenter is a KMIP client and works with a large number of KMIP 1.1 key managers. This brings choice and flexibility to customers. VM Keys do not persist in vCenter.
    5. VM Encryption makes use of the latest hardware advances inherent in the CPU’s today. It leverages AES-NI for encryption.
VM Encryption

VM Encryption

vMotion Encryption

This has been an ask for a long time and with 6.5 we deliver. What’s unique about vMotion encryption is that we are not encrypting the network. There are not certificates to manage or network settings to make.

The encryption happens on a per-VM level. Enabling vMotion encryption on a VM sets things in motion. When the VM is migrated, a randomly generated, one time use 256-bit key is generated by vCenter (it does not use the key manager for this key).

In addition, a 64-bit “Nonce” (an arbitrary number used only once in a crypto operation) is also generated. The encryption key and Nonce are packaged into the migration specification sent to both hosts. At that point all the VM vMotion data is encrypted with both the key and the Nonce, ensuring that communications can’t be used to replay the data.

vMotion encryption can be set on unencrypted VM’s and is always enforced on encrypted VM’s.

Encrypted vMotion

Encrypted vMotion

Secure Boot support

For vSphere 6.5 we are introducing Secure Boot support for virtual machines and for the ESXi hypervisor.

ESXi Secure Boot

ESXi Secure Boot

ESXi SECURE BOOT – With Secure Boot enabled, the UEFI firmware validates the digital signature of the ESXi kernel against a digital certificate in the UEFI firmware. That ensures that only a properly signed kernel boots. For ESXi, we are taking Secure Boot further adding cryptographic assurance of all components of ESXi. Today, ESXi is already made up of digitally signed packages, called VIB’s. (vSphere Installation Bundle) The ESXi file system maps to the content of those packages (the packages are never broken open). By leveraging that digital certificate in the host UEFI firmware, at boot time the already validated ESXi Kernel will, in turn, validate each VIB against the firmware-based certificate. This assures a cryptographically “clean” boot.

Note: If Secure Boot is enabled then you will not be able to forcibly install un-signed code on ESXi. This ensures that when Secure Boot is enabled that ESXi will only be running VMware digitally signed code.

Dramatically Simplified Experience

VIRTUAL MACHINE SECURE BOOT

For VM’s, SecureBoot is simple to enable. Your VM must be configured to use EFI firmware and then you enable Secure Boot with a checkbox. Note that if you turn on secure boot for a virtual machine, you can load only signed drivers into that virtual machine.

Secure Boot for Virtual Machines works with Windows or Linux.

Secure Boot for Virtual Machines

Secure Boot for Virtual Machines

Enhanced Logging

vSphere logs have traditionally been focused on troubleshooting and not “security” or even “IT operations”. This changes in vSphere 6.5 with the introduction of enhanced logging. Gone are the days where you’ll make a significant change to a virtual machine and only get a log that says “VM has been reconfigured”.

We’ve enhanced the logs and made them “actionable” by now sending the complete vCenter event such as “VM Reconfigure” out via the syslog data stream. The events now contain what I like to call “actionable data”. What I mean by that rather than just getting a notice that “something” has changed you now get what changed, what it changed from and what it changed to. This is data that I can “take action” against.

In 6.5, you will get a descriptive log of the action. For example, if I add 4GB of memory to a VM that has 6GB today, I’ll see a log that tells me what the setting was and what the new setting is. In a security context, if you move a VM from the vSwitch labeled “PCI” to the vSwitch labeled “Non-PCI” you will get a clear log describing that change. See the image below for an example.

Actionable Loging

Actionable Loging

Enhanced/Actionable Logging

Solutions like VMware Log Insight will now have a lot more data to display and present but more importantly, more detailed messages mean you can create more prescriptive alerts and remediation’s. More informed solutions help make more informed critical datacenter decisions.

Automation

All of these features will have some level of automation available out of the gate. In future blog articles you’ll see PowerCLI examples for encrypting and decrypting VM’s, enabling Secure Boot for VM’s, setting Encrypted vMotion policies on a VM and a script I used to build an Enhanced Logging demo that you can tweak to show the benefits of Enhanced Logging in your own environment. All of the script example will be released on GitHub.

Wrap Up

That’s it for vSphere 6.5 security! I hope you are as excited as I am about it! More details on each will be forthcoming in blogs and whitepapers. One thing to add is the vSphere 6.5 Security Hardening Guide. This will, as always, come out within 1 quarter after the GA of 6.5. I don’t anticipate major changes to the guide. Features like VM Encryption are not something you should expect in the hardening guide. For more information on the types of information that is now in the guide please reference this blog post.

As always, I appreciate your feedback and questions. You can reach out to me via email (mfoley at vmware dot com) or on Twitter @vspheresecurity or @mikefoley.

mike

To learn more about vSphere 6.5, please see the following resources.

Rating: 5/5