Jun 29

OpenStack and VMware NSX

In this video, we discuss the way in which Neutron, the networking project of OpenStack, and VMware NSX interact. We cover the basic Neutron workflows and their situation as it relates to the application, as well as the corresponding NSX element that is leveraged each time. With this, we aim to describe how NSX ultimately brings stability to Neutron

Rating: 5/5


Jun 21

NSX Series 02 – Microsegmentation in a single DC

This is the second of a series of 5 demos that show how the NSX Security Model works through several use cases. Don’t just believe what you see, try it yourself for free with VMware Hands-On-Labs (see below):

Rating: 5/5


Jun 21

NSX Series 01 – DFW Overview

This is the first of a series of 5 demos that show how the NSX Security Model works through several use cases. Don’t just believe what you see, try it yourself for free with VMware Hands-On-Labs (see below):

Rating: 5/5


Jun 11

Securing VMware® NSX

Created by nikhilvmw on Aug 22, 2014 9:48 aM. Last modified by hfreehling on Sep 15, 2014 11:00 AM.

Executive Summary

The VMware NSX network virtualization platform is a critical pillar of VMware’s Software Defined Data Center (SDDC) architecture. NSX network virtualization delivers for networking what VMware has already delivered for compute and storage. In much the same way that server virtualization allows operators to programmatically create, snapshot, delete and restore software-based virtual machines (VMs) on demand, NSX enables virtual networks to be created, saved and deleted and restored on demand without requiring any reconfiguration of the physical network.
The result fundamentally transforms the data center network operational model, reduces network provisioning time from days or weeks to minutes and dramatically simplifies network operations.

Due to the critical role NSX plays within an organization, hardening of the product along with secure topology will reduce the risk an organization may face. This document is intended to provide configuration information and topology recommendations to ensure a more secure deployment.
This paper is a draft document which covers some fundamentals of how one can securely deploy network virtualization with NSX. Updated with correct document.

NSX Traffic [Control, Management, and Data]

The main components of NSX include the NSX Manager, NSX Edge/Gateway, NSX Controllers, and NSX vSwitch. Great care must be given toward the placement and connectivity of these components within an organization’s network. NSX functions can be grouped into three categories: management plane, control plane, and data plane.

VMware-network-virtualization-solution-components.jpg

Figure 1 – VMware Network Virtualization Solution Components

Consumption Platform

The consumption of NSX can be driven directly via the NSX manager UI. In a vSphere environment this is available via the vSphere web interface. Typically end-users tie in network virtualization to their cloud management platform for deploying applications. NSX provides a rich set of integration into virtually any CMP via the REST API. Out of the box integration is also available through VMware vCloud Automation Center.

Management Plane

The NSX management plane is built by the NSX Manager. The NSX manager provides the single point of configuration and the REST API entry-points in a vSphere environment for NSX. The NSX Manager is also the integration point with vCenter.
Network traffic to and from the NSX Manager should be restricted and it’s recommended that it be placed on a management network where access is limited.
Access to the NSX manager utilizes a web redirect to only allow access via HTTPS.
Traffic from the NSX manager to other components such as vCenter and the ESXi is encrypted. These safe guards reduce some of the risk to the NSX manager, but it is recommended that it be separated from other traffic via physical or VLAN separation, at a minimum. The VMware vSphere Hardening Guides (http://www.vmware.com/security/hardening-guides.html) can be used to further explore protection of the management network.

Control Plane

The NSX Controller is the heart of the control plane. In a vSphere-optimized environment where VMware’s virtual distributed switches (VDS) are deployed, the controllers enable multicast free network virtualization and control plane programming of elements that enable logical distributed routing and logical network traffic within and across hypervisors.
In all cases, the controller is purely a part of the control plane and does not have any data plane traffic passing through it. The controller nodes are also deployed in a cluster of odd members in order to enable high-availability and scale. Any failure of the controller nodes does not impact any existing data plane traffic.
These communications does not carry any sensitive application data, but it is required for NSX to work properly. As of version 6.0.4 of NSX, controller to controller communication is unencrypted along with hypervisor to controller communication. Hence, it’s recommended that it be separated from other traffic via physical or VLAN separation, at a minimum. No user machines should be on this network.

Data Plane

The NSX Data plane consists of the NSX vSwitch. The vSwitch in NSX for vSphere is based on the vSphere Distributed Switch (VDS) with additional components to enable rich services. The add-on NSX components include kernel modules (VIBs) which run within the hypervisor kernel providing services such as distributed routing, distributed firewall and enable VXLAN bridging capabilities.

The NSX vSwitch (VDS) abstracts the physical network and provides access-level switching in the hypervisor. It is central to network virtualization because it enables logical networks that are independent of physical constructs such as VLAN. Some of the benefits of the VDS are:

  • Support for overlay networking leveraging the VXLAN and centralized network configuration. Overlay networking enables the following capabilities:
      o Creation of a flexible logical layer 2 (L2) overlay over existing IP networks on existing physical infrastructure without the need to re-architect any of the data center networks
      o Provisioning of communications (east–west and north–south) while maintaining isolation between tenants
      o Application workloads and virtual machines that are agnostic of the overlay network and operate as if they were connected to a physical L2 network
  • NSX vSwitch facilitates massive scale of hypervisors.
  • Multiple features—such as Port Mirroring, NetFlow/IPFIX, Configuration Backup and Restore, Network Health Check, QoS, and LACP—provide a comprehensive toolkit for traffic management, monitoring and troubleshooting within a virtual network.

Additionally, the data plane also consists of gateway devices that can either provide L2 bridging from the logical networking space (VXLAN) to the physical network (VLAN).

The gateway device is typically an NSX Edge virtual appliance. NSX Edge offers L2, L3, perimeter firewall, load balancing and other services such as SSL VPN, DHCP, etc

NSX Manager:

Topology and the NSX Manager Virtual Machine
The NSX Manager virtual machine (VM) is part of the management plane, certain considerations must be taken into account when deciding where to install and connect the VM.

1. Placement: Best practices dictate that the NSX Manager should be placed in a segmented and secured network. Since the NSX manager and vCenter are in continuous communication, it is recommended they be placed on the same network. Typically, the NSX manager and vCenter are placed on a management network where access is limited to specific users and/or systems. The management network should not contain any user or general network traffic.

2. Physical and network security: The following table provide ports use for communication with the NSX Manager. If you are securing the NSX manager from other network services, make sure the appropriate ports are open.

VMware-network-virtualization-solution-components.jpg

Table 1 – NSX for vSphere Ports & Protocol Requirements

Download

Download a full Securing VMware® NSX Technical White paper

Rating: 5/5


Jun 11

NSX-v 6.2.x – Security Hardening Guide

Created by RobertoMari on Oct 12,2014 5:22 PM. Last modified by vwade on Jun 10, 2016 2:40 PM

VMware NSX Hardening Guide Authors: Pravin Goyal, Greg Christopher, Michael Haines, Roberto Mari, Kausum Kumar, Wade Holmes

This is the Version 1.6 of the VMware® NSX for vSphere Hardening Guide.

This guide provides prescriptive guidance for customers on how to deploy and operate VMware® NSX in a secure manner.

Acknowledgements to the following contributors for reviewing and providing feedback to various sections of the document: Kausum Kumar, Roberto Mari, Scott Lowe, Ben Lin, Bob Motanagh, Dmitri Kalintsev, Greg Frascadore, Hadar Freehling, Kiran Kumar Thota, Pierre Ernst, Rob Randell, Roie Ben Haim, Yves Fauser

Guide is provided in an easy to consume spreadsheet format, with rich metadata (i.e. similar to existing VMware vSphere Hardening Guides) to allow for guideline classification and risk assessment.

Feedback and Comments to the Authors and the NSX Solution Team can be posted as comments to this community Post (Note: users must login on vmware communities before posting a comment).

Download

Download a full NSX-v Security Hardering Guide

Rating: 5/5


Jun 07

NSX F5 Design Guide

Created by ddesmidt on May 7, 2015 1:19 PM. Last modified by ddesmidt on May 7, 2015 1:29 PM.
Version 2

Intended Audience

The intended audience for this document includes virtualization and network architects seeking to deploy VMware® NSX™ for vSphere® in combination with F5® BIG-IP® Local Traffic Manager™ devices.
Note: A solid understanding based on hands-on experience with both NSX-v and F5 BIG-IP LTM is a pre-requisite to successfully understanding this design guide.

NSX deployments can be today coupled with F5 BIG-IP appliances or Virtual Edition.
Such deployment gives to NSX customers a flexible, powerful, and agile infrastructure with the richness of F5 ADC service.
Note: F5 deployment + configuration done from F5.

Overview

The Software Defined Data Center is defined by server virtualization, storage virtualization and network virtualization and server virtualization has already proved the value of SDDC architectures in reducing costs and complexity of compute infrastructure. VMware NSX network virtualization provides the third critical pillar of the SDDC and extends the same benefits to the data center network to accelerate network service provisioning, simplify network operations and improve network economics.

VMware NSX-v is the leading network virtualization solution in the market today and is being deployed across all vertical markets and market segments. NSX reproduces L2-L7 networking and security including L2 Switching, L3 Routing, Firewalling, Load Balancing, and IPSEC/VPN secure access. services completely in software and allows programmatic provisioning and management of these services. More information about these functions is available in the NSX Design Guide.

F5 BIG-IP is the leading application delivery controller in the market today. The BIG-IP product family provides Software-Defined Application Services™ (SDAS) designed to improve the performance, reliability and security of mission-critical applications. BIG-IP is available in a variety of form factors, ranging from ASIC-based physical appliances to vSphere-based virtual appliances. NSX deployments can be coupled with F5 BIG-IP appliances or Virtual Edition form factors.

Furthermore, F5 offers a centralized management and orchestration platform called BIG-IQ.
By deploying BIG-IP and NSX together, organizations are able to achieve service provisioning automation and agility enabled by the SDDC combined with the richness of the F5 application delivery services they have come to expect.
This design guide provides recommended practices and topologies to optimize interoperability between the NSX platform and F5 BIG-IP physical and virtual appliances. This interoperability design guide is intended for those customers who would like to adopt the SDDC while ensuring compatibility and minimal disruption to their existing BIGIP environment. The Recommended practice guide will provide step-by-step guidance to implement the topologies outlined in this document.

NSX/F5 Topology Options

“BIG-IP Form Factor” / “NSX overlay or not” / “BIG-IP placement” Relationships

There are about 20 possible topologies that can be used when connecting BIG-IP to an NSX environment but this Design Guide will focus on the three that best represent the form factor, connection method, and logical topology combinations. In addition, the Design Guide will highlight the Pros and Cons of each of the three topologies.

The following figure describes the relationship of:

  • BIG-IP form factor:
    o BIG-IP Virtual Edition (“VE”)
    o BIG-IP physical appliance
  • With NSX overlay/Without NSX overlay:
    o VXLAN
    o non-VXLAN (VLAN tagged on untagged)

  • BIG-IP placement:
  • o BIG-IP parallel to NSX Edge
    o BIG-IP parallel to DLR
    o BIG-IP One-Arm connected to server network(s)
    o BIG-IP on top of NSX Edge
    o BIG-IP on top of NSX DLR

“BIG-IP Form Factor” / “NSX overlay or not” / “BIG-IP placement” Relationships

Figure 1 – “BIG-IP Form Factor” / “NSX overlay or not” / “BIG-IP placement” Relationships

This design guide provides recommended practices and topologies to optimize interoperability between the NSX platform and F5 BIG-IP physical and virtual appliances.

Download NSX F5 Design Guide v1.6


May 30

VMware NSX Technical Introduction

VMware NSX is the network virtualization platform that delivers the operational model of a VM for the network to transform data center operations and economics.

Rating: 5/5


May 19

VMware vRA + NSX Technical Deep-dive Presentation

VMware vRealize Automation (vRA) is the powerful automation engine within VMware’s vRealize Cloud Management Platform (CMP). vRA is designed to automate not just applications and service delivery, but also the infrastructure ecosystem around them, resulting in an app-centric authoring, provisioning and lifecycle management solution. A critical component of that infrastructure is a Networking and Security strategy that can meet the demands of new and existing applications while protecting enterprises against a modern threat.

While vRA has provided enhanced networking and security integration in the form of NSX in the past, the latest release, vRA 7.x, ups the ante to make building, consuming, and lifecycle managing application-centric network services a core function of service delivery.

This presentation is a technical overview of the integration, services and capabilities delivered with vRA 7 + NSX.
NOTE: This video is roughly 50 minutes in length so it would be worth blocking out some time to watch it!

Rating: 5/5


Apr 23

NSX-v Operations Guide

Purpose

This guide shows how to perform day-to-day management of an NSX for vSphere (“NSX-v”) deployment. This information can be used to help plan and carry out operational monitoring and management of your NSX-v implementation.
To monitor physical network operations, administrators have traditionally collected various types of data from the devices that provide network connectivity and services. Broadly the data can be categorized as:

    Statistics and events
    ■ Flow level data
    ■ Packet level data

Monitoring and troubleshooting tools use the above types of data and help administrators manage and operate networks. Collectively, these types of information are referred to as “network and performance monitoring and diagnostics” (NPMD) data. The diagram below summarizes the types of NPMD data and the tools that consume this information.

NPMD data diagram

NPMD data diagram

The tools used for monitoring physical networks can be used to monitor virtual networks as well. Using standard protocols, the NSX platform provides network monitoring data similar to that provided by physical devices, giving administrators a clear view of virtual network conditions.
In this document, we’ll describe how an administrator can monitor and retrieve network statistics, network flow information, packet information, and NSX system events.

Audience

This document is intended for those involved in the configuration, maintenance, and administration of VMware NSX-v. The intended audience includes the following business roles:

    – Architects and planners responsible for driving architecture-level decisions.
    – Security decision makers responsible for business continuity planning.
    – Consultants, partners, and IT personnel, who need the knowledge for deploying the solution.

This guide is written with the assumption that an administrator who will use these procedures is familiar with VMware vSphere and NSX-v, and we assume the reader has as strong networking background. For detailed explanations of NSX-v concepts and terminology, please refer to the NSX for vSphere documentation website.

Scope

This guide covers NSX-v and its integration with core VMware technologies such as vSphere and Virtual Distributed Switch (vDS). It does not attempt to cover architectural design decisions or installation. Also, while there are third-party integrations and extensive APIs available to programmatically program and manage NSX, this document does not focus on APIs or third-party integration including other VMware products. We do mention specific APIs when they offer a recommended or efficient method for configuring NSX, and when there is no direct UI function available to perform the desired action.

Download

Download out the full NSX-v Operations Guide, rev 1.5

Rating: 5/5


Mar 03

vCloud Automation Center and NSX Integration Technical Deep Dive

VMworld 2014 MGT1969 vCloud Automation Center and NSX Integration Technical Deep Dive.

NOTE: This video is roughly 60 minutes in length so it would be worth blocking out some time to watch it!

Rating: 5/5