May 19

VMware vRA + NSX Technical Deep-dive Presentation

VMware vRealize Automation (vRA) is the powerful automation engine within VMware’s vRealize Cloud Management Platform (CMP). vRA is designed to automate not just applications and service delivery, but also the infrastructure ecosystem around them, resulting in an app-centric authoring, provisioning and lifecycle management solution. A critical component of that infrastructure is a Networking and Security strategy that can meet the demands of new and existing applications while protecting enterprises against a modern threat.

While vRA has provided enhanced networking and security integration in the form of NSX in the past, the latest release, vRA 7.x, ups the ante to make building, consuming, and lifecycle managing application-centric network services a core function of service delivery.

This presentation is a technical overview of the integration, services and capabilities delivered with vRA 7 + NSX.
NOTE: This video is roughly 50 minutes in length so it would be worth blocking out some time to watch it!

Rating: 5/5


May 15

What’s New in VMware vSphere™ 5.0 Networking

Introduction

With the release of VMware vSphere™ 5.0 (“vSphere”), VMware brings a number of powerful new features and enhancements to the networking capabilities of the vSphere platform. These new network capabilities enable customers to run business-critical applications with confidence and provide the flexibility to enable customers to respond to business needs more rapidly. All the networking capabilities discussed in this document are available only with the VMware vSphere Distributed Switch (Distributed Switch).

There are two broad types of networking capabilities that are new or enhanced in the VMware vSphere 5.0
release. The first type improves the network administrator’s ability to monitor and troubleshoot virtual
infrastructure traffic by introducing features such as:

  • NetFlow
  • Port mirror

The second type focuses on enhancements to the network I/O control (NIOC) capability first released in
vSphere 4.1. These NIOC enhancements target the management of I/O resources in consolidated I/O
environments with 10GB network interface cards. The enhancements to NIOC enable customers to provide
end-to-end quality of service (QoS) through allocating I/O shares for user-defined traffic types as well as tagging packets for prioritization by external network infrastructure. The following are the key NIOC
enhancements:

  • User-defned resource pool
  • vSphere replication trafc type
  • IEEE 802.1p tagging

The following sections will provide higher-level details on new and enhanced networking capabilities in vSphere 5.0.

Network Monitoring and Troubleshooting

In a vSphere 5.0 environment, virtual network switches provide connectivity for virtual machines running on VMware® ESXi™ hosts to communicate with each other as well as connectivity to the external physical
infrastructure. Network administrators want more visibility into this traffic that is flowing in the virtual infrastructure. This visibility will help them monitor and troubleshoot network issues. VMware vSphere 5.0 introduces two new features in the Distributed Switch that provide the required monitoring and troubleshooting capability to the virtual infrastructure.

NetFlow

NetFlow is a networking protocol that collects IP traffic information as records and sends them to a collector such as CA NetQoS for traffic flow analysis. VMware vSphere 5.0 supports NetFlow v5, which is the most common version supported by network devices. NetFlow capability in the vSphere 5.0 platform provides visibility into virtual infrastructure traffic that includes:

  • Intrahost virtual machine traffic (virtual machine–to–virtual machine traffic on the same host)
  • Interhost virtual machine traffic (virtual machine–to–virtual machine traffic on different hosts)
  • Virtual machine–physical infrastructure traffic

Figure 1 shows a Distributed Switch configured to send NetFlow records to a collector that is connected to an external network switch. The blue dotted line with arrow indicates the NetFlow session that is established to send flow records for the collector to analyze.

NetFlow Traffic

Figure 1. NetFlow Traffic

Usage

NetFlow capability on a Distributed Switch along with a NetFlow collector tool helps monitor application flows and measures flow performance over time. It also helps in capacity planning and ensuring that I/O resources are utilized properly by different applications, based on their needs.

IT administrators who want to monitor the performance of application flows running in the virtualized
environment can enable flow monitoring on a Distributed Switch.

Configuration

NetFlow on Distributed Switches can be enabled at the port group level, at an individual port level or at the uplink level. When configuring NetFlow at the port level, administrators should select the NetFlow override tab, which will make sure that flows are monitored even if the port group–level NetFlow is disabled.

Port Mirror

Port mirroring is the capability on a network switch to send a copy of network packets seen on a switch port to a network monitoring device connected to another switch port. Port mirroring is also referred to as Switch Port Analyzer (SPAN) on Cisco switches. In VMware vSphere 5.0, a Distributed Switch provides a similar port mirroring capability to that available on a physical network switch. After a port mirror session is configured with a destination—a virtual machine, a vmknic or an uplink port—the Distributed Switch copies packets to the destination. Port mirroring provides visibility into:

  • Intrahost virtual machine traffic (virtual machine–to–virtual machine traffic on the same host)
  • Interhost virtual machine traffic (virtual machine–to–virtual machine traffic on different hosts)

Figure 2 shows different types of traffic flows that can be monitored when a virtual machine on a host acts as a destination or monitoring device. All traffic shown by the orange dotted line with arrow is mirrored traffic that is sent to the destination virtual machine.

NetFlow Traffic

Figure 2. Port Mirror Traffic Flows When Destination Where Packets Are Mirrored Is a Virtual Machine

Usage

The port mirroring capability on a Distributed Switch is a valuable tool that helps network administrators in debugging network issues in a virtual infrastructure. The granular control over monitoring ingress, egress or all trafc of a port helps administrators fne-tune what trafc is sent for analysis.

Configuration

Port mirror configuration can be done at the Distributed Switch level, where a network administrator can create a port mirror session by identifying the traffic source that needs monitoring and the traffic destination where the traffic will be mirrored. The traffic source can be any port with ingress, egress or all traffic selected. The traffic destination can be any virtual machine, vmknic or uplink port.

Download

Download a full What’s New in VMware vSphere™ 5.0 Networking Technical White Paper.

Rating: 5/5


Apr 23

NSX-v Operations Guide

Purpose

This guide shows how to perform day-to-day management of an NSX for vSphere (“NSX-v”) deployment. This information can be used to help plan and carry out operational monitoring and management of your NSX-v implementation.
To monitor physical network operations, administrators have traditionally collected various types of data from the devices that provide network connectivity and services. Broadly the data can be categorized as:

    Statistics and events
    ■ Flow level data
    ■ Packet level data

Monitoring and troubleshooting tools use the above types of data and help administrators manage and operate networks. Collectively, these types of information are referred to as “network and performance monitoring and diagnostics” (NPMD) data. The diagram below summarizes the types of NPMD data and the tools that consume this information.

NPMD data diagram

NPMD data diagram

The tools used for monitoring physical networks can be used to monitor virtual networks as well. Using standard protocols, the NSX platform provides network monitoring data similar to that provided by physical devices, giving administrators a clear view of virtual network conditions.
In this document, we’ll describe how an administrator can monitor and retrieve network statistics, network flow information, packet information, and NSX system events.

Audience

This document is intended for those involved in the configuration, maintenance, and administration of VMware NSX-v. The intended audience includes the following business roles:

    – Architects and planners responsible for driving architecture-level decisions.
    – Security decision makers responsible for business continuity planning.
    – Consultants, partners, and IT personnel, who need the knowledge for deploying the solution.

This guide is written with the assumption that an administrator who will use these procedures is familiar with VMware vSphere and NSX-v, and we assume the reader has as strong networking background. For detailed explanations of NSX-v concepts and terminology, please refer to the NSX for vSphere documentation website.

Scope

This guide covers NSX-v and its integration with core VMware technologies such as vSphere and Virtual Distributed Switch (vDS). It does not attempt to cover architectural design decisions or installation. Also, while there are third-party integrations and extensive APIs available to programmatically program and manage NSX, this document does not focus on APIs or third-party integration including other VMware products. We do mention specific APIs when they offer a recommended or efficient method for configuring NSX, and when there is no direct UI function available to perform the desired action.

Download

Download out the full NSX-v Operations Guide, rev 1.5

Rating: 5/5


Mar 03

vCloud Automation Center and NSX Integration Technical Deep Dive

VMworld 2014 MGT1969 vCloud Automation Center and NSX Integration Technical Deep Dive.

NOTE: This video is roughly 60 minutes in length so it would be worth blocking out some time to watch it!

Rating: 5/5


Apr 30

Live Stream – VMware NSX: Training & Demo

Tech Data hosted a live stream event with special guests from VMware for a training and demo on NSX.
NOTE: This video is roughly 18 minutes in length so it would be worth blocking out some time to watch it!

Rating: 5/5


Apr 23

VMware NSX Security and Micro Segmentation

Raj is back to tell the team all about one of VMware NSX’s top security benefit, micro segmentation!

Rating: 5/5


Apr 23

VMworld 2013: Session NET5847- NSX: Introducing the World to VMware NSX

This session will focus on introducing NSX. It will detail the product and its components, the key use cases, partner integrations and pricing and packaging.
NOTE: This video is roughly 50 minutes in length so it would be worth blocking out some time to watch it!

Rating: 5/5


Apr 22

VMworld 2014 NET3305 S Virtualize your Network with VMware NSX

NOTE: This video is roughly 60 minutes in length so it would be worth blocking out some time to watch it!

Rating: 5/5


Mar 10

VMware Security Hardening Guides

Security Hardening Guides provide prescriptive guidance for customers on how to deploy and operate VMware products in a secure manner. Guides for vSphere are provided in an easy to consume spreadsheet format, with rich metadata to allow for guideline classification and risk assessment. They also include script examples for enabling security automation. Comparison documents are provided that list changes in guidance in successive versions of the guide.

Hardening Guides

vSphere 6.5

vSphere 6.0

vSphere 5.5 Update 1

vSphere 5.5

vSphere 5.1

vSphere 5.0 and earlier

Other VMware Products

Rating: 5/5


Mar 09

VMware vSphere 4.1 Security Hardening Guide

Product / Service Categories

Project Name

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Product / Service Categories

Project Name

Talk about this portfolio piece--who you did it for and why, plus what the results were (potential customers love to hear about real-world results). Discuss any unique facets of the project--was it accomplished under an impossible deadline?--and show how your business went above and beyond to make the impossible happen.